Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät

Suche

Seminar: Information Systems Research


Dozent(in): Dr. Manuel Trenz; An Bui, M.Sc.; Alexander Frey, M.Sc.; Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc.
Termin: Bewerbung: 06.04. – 19.04.15
Gebäude/Raum: FW 2101 (Kick-Off), FW 2101 (Zwischenpräsentation)
Weitere Termine: Zusage: 22.04.15
Kick-Off: 29.04.15, 15:45-17:15
Präsentation: 02.07.15, 10:00-14:00
Abgabe: 01.07.15, 12:00 (Zwischenpräsentation), 14.08.15, 12:00 (schriftiche Arbeit)
Ansprechpartner: Dr. Manuel Trenz

Zusammenfassung:

At the end of this module, students have a basic understanding of empiricial research in information systems. Topics include IT innovation, IT adoption and continuance, digital strategy, business models, pricing, cloud computing, information privacy, electronic healthcare and others.

The goals of this seminar are:
  • Fundamental understanding of the principles of empirical academic work
  • Ability to systematically and independently adress a research topic
  • Knowledge of the methodological and theoretical foundations necessary to write a master thesis in the area of information systems


Inhalt der Lehrveranstaltung:

Part 1
  • Introduction to academic research principles and academic writing

Part 2

  • Examination of the topic and the research question
  • Investigation of the theoretical and methodological foundation
  • Structured analysis of the current state of research
  • Analysis and structuration of the results with regard to one specific topic in the field of information systems research

Part 3

  • Writing of the seminar thesis
  • Presentation and discussion of the results

Literatur zur Lehrveranstaltung:

Die Literatur wird im Rahmen des Seminars zugeteilt.


Vorkenntnisse für die Lehrveranstaltung:

Grundlegendes Wissen zu den Themenfeldern (bspw. durch Besuch der Vorlesungen des Lehrstuhls) ist hilfreich. 

Gute Englischkenntnisse sind notwendig, um die Literatur zu verstehen und die Präsentation sowie die Seminararbeit auszuarbeiten.

Der Besuch eines Einführungskurses der Universitätsbibliothek wird empfohlen.


Bewerbungszeitraum:

Die Plätze in den Seminaren sind limitiert. Bitte nutzen Sie während der Anmeldephase Digicampus.

 

Seminarthemen

Title

1) Who influences my decisions and why? A structured literature review on social influence theory in Information Systems Research

Goal

Social influence theory describes different processes through which individuals may be influenced in their opinions, attitudes, or behaviors.  Since the interaction with technology is often a social process that also involves certain levels of uncertainty, social influences can be expected to be important to understand phenomena with regards to information systems.

This master seminar thesis has two goals. First, the development of social influence theory as well as the theory itself should be described briefly. Second, a structured literature review on the application of social influence theory in Information Systems Research should be undertaken. The work should conclude with a research agenda proposing new avenues with regards to social influence theory in this research field.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Burnkrant, R.E. and Cousineau, A. 1975. “Informational and Normative Social Influence in Buyer Behavior,” Journal of Consumer Research (2:3), pp. 206–215.

T: Lewis, W., Agarwal, R. and Sambamurthy, V. 2003. Sources of influence on beliefs about information technology use: an empirical study of knowledge workers, MIS Quarterly (27:4), pp. 657–678.

T:  Venkatesh, V., Morris, M.G., Davis, G. B. and Davis, F.D. 2003. User Acceptance of Information Technology: Toward a Unified View, MIS Quarterly (27:3), pp. 425–478.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz 

Title

2) Why Are Information Systems Persuasive? – A Structured Literature Review on Persuasive Features of Information Systems 

Goal

Information systems are said to be persuasive if they are designed in such a way that they can reinforce, change or shape the attitudes or behaviors of their users without being coercive or deceiving. If they are successful in steering users to voluntarily change their attitude or behavior toward a predetermined or more preferred state, information systems can be applied to pursue higher purpose goals (e.g. healthier lifestyle, environmental sustainability).

The goal of this master seminar thesis is twofold: First, to provide clear distinctions between the term “persuasive” and related terms (e.g., “intrinisically motivating”). The second aim is to conduct a structured literature review to provide a comprehensive overview on extant research which pertain to the concept of persuasion in the IS discipline and what characteristics or features an information system needs to be persuasive.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Fogg, B. J. 1999. Persuasive Technologies, Communications of the ACM (42:5), pp. 26–29.

T: Oinas-Kukkonen, H., and Harjumaa, M. 2008. “Towards Deeper Understanding of Persuasion in Software and Information Systems,” in Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interaction (ACHI), Sainte Luce, Martinique, pp. 200–205.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

M: Okoli, C., and Schabram, K. 2010. “A Guide to Conducting a Systematic Literature Review of Information Systems Research,” Sprouts: Working Papers on Information Systems (10:26).

Supervisor

An Bui, M.Sc.

Title

3) Digital Business Models and the Sharing Economy

Goal

Instead of buying and owning products, consumers are increasingly interested in leasing and sharing them over certain internet platforms. This recent trend is often referred to as the “Sharing Economy”. Which digital business models exist and how can companies best respond to the collaborative consumption trend?

The aim of this seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review about digital business models and possibilities for companies to adapt their business to the sharing economy. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic and avenues for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Veit, D., Clemons, E., Benlian, A., Buxmann, P., Hess, T., Kundisch, D., Leimeister, J.M., Loos, P., and Spann, M. 2014. Business Models. An Informations Systems Research Agenda,” Business & Information Systems Engineering (6:1), pp. 45-53.

T: Matzler, K., Veider V., and Kathan W. 2015. Adapting to the Sharing Economy,” MIT Sloan Management Review (56:2).

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. Analyzing the past to prepare for the future: Writing a literature review,” MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

M: Okoli, C., and Schabram, K. 2010. “A Guide to Conducting a Systematic Literature Review of Information Systems Research,” Sprouts: Working Papers on Information Systems (10:26).

Supervisor

Alexander Frey, M.Sc.

Title

4) The perspective of privacy calculus - chances and limitations

Goal

Privacy calculus is a common approach to study the joint effect of opposing forces on privacy perception and privacy-related behavior. The theory suggests that a person's information disclosure behavior is based on a calculus in which a person weights risks and benefits. To give an example: Facebook offers its service for free. Thus you can easily connect with your friends and share all kinds of information with them, thereby staying in contact with them. On the other hand, you risk that Facebook monetizes your information. You might get personalized advertisements, for example. If you now rationally weight the benefits against the risks to decide whether to disclose personal information or not, you apply a privacy calculus.

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review bringing together insights from previous literature to explain whether and how a privacy calculus is applied, where its limitations are and how those can be overcome. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic and avenues for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T:  Dinev, T., and Hart, P. 2006. “An Extended Privacy Calculus Model for E-Commerce Transactions,” Information Systems Research (17:1), pp. 61–80.

T: Xu, H., Teo, H.-H., Tan, B. C., and Agarwal, R. 2009. “The Role of Push-Pull Technology in Privacy Calculus: The Case of Location-Based Services,” Journal of Management Information Systems (26:3), pp. 135–174.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review,” MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13-23.

Supervisor

Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc.

Title

5) Reviewing the Role of “Motivation” in IS Adoption Research 

Goal

When it comes to the adoption of information systems, motivation has been identified as a crucial factor determining individuals’ behavior and intentions.

The aim of this seminar paper is to give a comprehensive overview over the related literature on how the concept of “motivation” is used in IS adoption research. Ideally, the seminar paper should result in an overview on what types of motivations exist and give recommendations on which type to deploy in certain cases.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Gerow, J.E., Ayyagari, R., Thatcher, J.B., and Roth, P.L. 2012. Can We Have Fun @ Work? The Role of Intrinsic Motivation for Utilitarian Systems, European Journal of Information Systems (22:3), pp. 360-380.


T: Malhotra, Y., Galletta, D.F., and Kirsch, L.J. 2008. How Endogenous Motivations Influence User Intentions: Beyond the Dichotomy of Extrinsic and Intrinsic User Motivations, Journal of Management Information Systems (25:1), pp. 267-299

T: Venkatesh, V. 1999. Creation of Favorable User Perceptions: Exploring the Role of Intrinsic Motivation," MIS Quarterly (23:2), pp. 239-260.

M: Webster, J.; Watson, R. T. (2002): Analyzing the past to prepare for the future: Writing a literature review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii. 

M: Okoli, C., and Schabram, K. 2010. “A Guide to Conducting a Systematic Literature Review of Information Systems Research,” Sprouts: Working Papers on Information Systems (10:26).

Supervisor

An Bui, M.Sc.

Title

6) Sharing goods and services in the digital era: A structured literature review

Goal

Sharing platforms such as AirBnB or Uber are mentioned more and more in magazines and newspapers. They provide services in unlocking the value inherent in sharing spare resources with people who want them. This recent trend is often referred to as the “Sharing Economy”, which is said to increase welfare for society. 

The aim of this seminar paper is to review and structure existing literature on sharing economy as well as to identify research gaps. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic and avenues for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Belk, R. 2014. You are what you can access: Sharing and collaborative consumption online,” Journal Of Business Research, (67:8), pp. 1595-1600.

T: Bardhi, F., & Eckhardt, G. M. 2012. Access-Based Consumption: The Case of Car Sharing,” Journal Of Consumer Research, (39:4), pp. 881-898.

M: Webster, J.; Watson, R. T. 2002. Analyzing the past to prepare for the future: Writing a literature review,” MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

M: Okoli, C., and Schabram, K. 2010. “A Guide to Conducting a Systematic Literature Review of Information Systems Research,” Sprouts: Working Papers on Information Systems (10:26).

Supervisor

Alexander Frey, M.Sc.

Title

7) What is “continued use”? A critical review of studies on IS continuance

Goal

Behavioral research in information systems has long addressed questions of adoption of particular innovations or systems. However, adoption research has been criticized for its short-term focus. Even though initial adoption is important, ensuring the continued use of information systems is crucial for realizing their benefits. In a similar fashion as the construct “adoption” (Sharma et. al 2009), many different approaches to measure continuance have been used in research. 

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review on the manifestations of continued use or continuance in Information Systems Research. The work should discuss different attempts to measure continued use, its definitions and potential differences in the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way. A critical reflection and potential avenues for future research should conclude the thesis.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Bhattacherjee, A. 2001. Understanding Information Systems Continuance: An Expectation-Confirmation Model, MIS Quarterly (25:3), pp. 351–370.

T: Sharma, R., Yetton, P. and Crawford, J. 2009. Estimating the Effect of Common Method Variance: The Method-Method Pair Technique with an Illustration from TAM Research, MIS Quarterly (33:3), pp. 473–A13.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz

Title

8) The antecedents of information disclosure

Goal

Many businesses depend on information that their users willingly share with the service. To name a few examples: To order goods online, people have to provide contact or financial information. But would they do this in every online shop? In social networks, people share what’s going on in their life or what videos and news articles they are interested in. But how do they decide what to disclose and what not to disclose?

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review bringing together insights from previous literature to identify antecedents of information disclosure that help to explain e.g. when, why and to whom which information is disclosed online. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic and avenues for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Krasnova, H., Spiekermann, S., Koroleva, K., and Hildebrand, T. 2010. “Online social networks: why we disclose,” Journal of Information Technology (25:2), pp. 109–125

T: Norberg, P. A., Horne, D. R., and Horne, D. A. 2007. “The Privacy Paradox: Personal Information Disclosure Intentions versus Behaviors,” Journal of Consumer Affairs (41:1), pp. 100–126.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review,” MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13-23.

Supervisor

Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc.

 

 


weitere Informationen zu der Lehrveranstaltung:

empfohlenes Studiensemester der Lehrveranstaltung: ab dem 2. Semester
Fachrichtung Lehrveranstaltung: BWL
Dauer der Lehrveranstaltung: 4 SWS
Typ der Lehrveranstaltung: S - Seminar
Leistungspunkte: 6 ECTS
Bereich: Master iBWL/iVWL: Major/Minor S&I; ReWi: SB III; Inf. & Infw.: Wirtschaftsinf.
Prüfung: Referat / Hausarbeit
Turnus des Prüfungsangebots: jedes SS/WS
Semester: alle WS und SS