Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät

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Seminar: Information Systems Research


Dozent(in): Prof. Dr. Daniel Veit; Dr. Manuel Trenz; Anna Budrevich, M.Sc.; Alexander Frey, M.Sc.; Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc.; Vanessa Schäffner, M.Sc.; Dipl.-Kfm. Dennis Steininger
Termin: Bewerbung: 04.04. – 17.04.16
Gebäude/Raum: Kick-Off: FW 1207; Zwischenpräsentation: FW 1207
Weitere Termine: Benachrichtigung: 20.04.16
Kick-Off: 21.04.16, 9:00-11:00 Uhr
Zwischenpräsentation: 21.06.16, 14:00-18:00 Uhr
Abgabe: 16.08.16, 12:00 Uhr
Ansprechpartner: Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc.

Zusammenfassung:

At the end of this module, students have a basic understanding of empiricial research in information systems. Topics include IT innovation, IT adoption and continuance, digital strategy, business models, pricing, cloud computing, information privacy, electronic healthcare and others.

The goals of this seminar are:
  • Fundamental understanding of the principles of empirical academic work
  • Ability to systematically and independently adress a research topic
  • Knowledge of the methodological and theoretical foundations necessary to write a master thesis in the area of information systems


Inhalt der Lehrveranstaltung:

Part 1
  • Introduction to academic research principles and academic writing

Part 2

  • Examination of the topic and the research question
  • Investigation of the theoretical and methodological foundation
  • Structured analysis of the current state of research
  • Analysis and structuration of the results with regard to one specific topic in the field of information systems research

Part 3

  • Writing of the seminar thesis
  • Presentation and discussion of the results

Literatur zur Lehrveranstaltung:

Die Literatur wird im Rahmen des Seminars zugeteilt.


Vorkenntnisse für die Lehrveranstaltung:

Grundlegendes Wissen zu den Themenfeldern (bspw. durch Besuch der Vorlesungen des Lehrstuhls) ist hilfreich. 

Gute Englischkenntnisse sind notwendig, um die Literatur zu verstehen und die Präsentation sowie die Seminararbeit auszuarbeiten.

Der Besuch eines Einführungskurses der Universitätsbibliothek wird empfohlen.


Bewerbungszeitraum:

Die Plätze in den Seminaren sind limitiert. Bitte nutzen Sie während der Anmeldephase Digicampus.

Seminarthemen

Title

1) Discontinuance and Switching of Online Services

Goal

Today online services are ubiquitous and many people are using these services. For instance Netflix, Amazon Video, or Watchever provide on demand access to movies and TV series. If individuals subscribe one of these online services, why do they disuse a certain service or why do they switch from one service provider to another?

Aim of this thesis is to provide a structured review of studies in the information systems area that have already examined discontinuance and switching of online services. The investigated aspects why people discontinue using a certain online service should be categorized and analyzed. 

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Xu, Y. (Calvin), Yang, Y., Cheng, Z., & Lim, J. 2014. Retaining and attracting users in social networking services: An empirical investigation of cyber migration, The Journal of Strategic Information Systems (23:3), pp. 239–253.

T: Cenfetelli, R. T. 2004. Inhibitors and Enablers as Dual Factor Concepts in Technology Usage, Journal of the Association for Information Systems (5:11), pp. 472-492.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review,” MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Alexander Frey, M.Sc

Title

2) Success Factors in Crowdfunding: An Interdisciplinary Review

Goal

The young phenomenon of crowdfunding is usually defined as capital funding through the use of (internet) technology and the power of an (anonymous) crowd that supports by many giving small amounts of money for a specific project (Beaulieu et al. 2015). The phenomenon draws from many disciplines such as information systems for the technological base, finance as for the investment part, and entrepreneurship for founders needing resources to realize their projects. However, this makes it complex for scholars to gain an overview on what has been done in research yet. This seminar tries to shed light on the factors of success in crowdfunding by answering the research question: What has been found to influence crowdfunding and crowdinvesting success in existing literature? This question is addressed by systematically reviewing the interdisciplinary research landscape.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Beaulieu, T., Sarker, S., and Sarker, S. 2015. “A Conceptual Framework for Understanding Crowdfunding,” Communications of the Association for Information Systems (37:1).

T: Belleflamme, P., Lambert, T., and Schwienbacher, A. 2014. “Crowdfunding: Tapping the right crowd,” Journal of Business Venturing (29:5), pp. 585–609.

T: Bruton, G., Khavul, S., Siegel, D., and Wright, M. 2015. “New Financial Alternatives in Seeding Entrepreneurship: Microfinance, Crowdfunding, and Peer-to-Peer Innovations,” Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice (39:1), pp. 9–26.

T: Burtch, G., Ghose, A., and Wattal, S. 2013. “An Empirical Examination of the Antecedents and Consequences of Contribution Patterns in Crowd-Funded Markets,” Information Systems Research (24:3), pp. 499–519.

T: Mollick, E. 2014. “The Dynamics of Crowdfunding: An Exploratory Study,” Journal of Business Venturing (29:1), pp. 1–16.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review,” MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

M: Smith, H. J., Dinev, T., and Xu, H. 2011. “Information Privacy Research: An Interdisciplinary Review,” MIS Quarterly (35:4), pp. 980–1016.

M: Okoli, C., and Schabram, K. 2010. “A Guide to Conducting a Systematic Literature Review of Information Systems Research,” Sprouts: Working Papers on Information Systems (10:26), pp. 1–5.

M: Wolfswinkel, J. F., Furtmueller, E., and Wilderom, C. P. M. 2011. “Using Grounded Theory as a Method for Rigorously Reviewing Literature,” European Journal of Information Systems (22) , pp. 1–11.

Supervisor

Dipl.-Kfm. Dennis Steininger

Title

3) Founder Teams and the Performance of New High-Tech Ventures: An Interdisciplinary Review

Goal

The founder team, especially in IT and high-tech startups, is seen as having a major influence on the performance of such new ventures. But what are the factors influencing this? Are experience, the skills or university degrees (for example a degree in IS) important? Is it the heterogeneity of the team (different disciplines), the cultural backgrounds (e.g., different nationalities), or other factors that matter? This seminar seeks to identify these main factors influencing team performance of new ventures in existing literature. This is done through an interdisciplinary literature review.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Spiegel, O., Abbassi, P., Zylka, M. P., Schlagwein, D., Fischbach, K., and Schoder, D. 2015. “Business Model Development, Founders’ Social Capital and the Success of Early Stage Internet Start-Ups: A Mixed-Method Study,” Information Systems Journal, online first.

T: Chaganti, R. (Raj) S., Watts, A. D., Chaganti, R., and Zimmerman-Treichel, M. 2008. “Ethnic-immigrants in founding teams: Effects on prospector strategy and performance in new Internet ventures,” Journal of Business Venturing (23:1), pp. 113–139.

T: Chowdhury, S. 2005. “Demographic Diversity for Building an Effective Entrepreneurial Team: Is It Important?,” Journal of Business Venturing (20:6), pp. 727–746.

T: Stuart, R. W., and Abetti, P. A. 1990. “Impact of Entrepreneurial and Management Experience on Early Performance,” Journal of Business Venturing (5:3), pp. 151–162.

T: Ruef, M., Aldrich, H. E., and Carter, N. M. 2003. The Structure of Founding Teams: Homophily, Strong Ties, and Isolation among U.S. Entrepreneurs. American Sociological Review (68:2), pp. 195–222.

T: Amason, A. C., Shrader, R. C., and Tompson, G. H. 2006. “Newness and Novelty: Relating Top Management Team Composition to New Venture Performance,” Journal of Business Venturing (21:1), pp. 125–148.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review,” MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

M: Smith, H. J., Dinev, T., and Xu, H. 2011. “Information Privacy Research: An Interdisciplinary Review,” MIS Quarterly (35:4), pp. 980–1016.

M: Okoli, C., and Schabram, K. 2010. “A Guide to Conducting a Systematic Literature Review of Information Systems Research,” Sprouts: Working Papers on Information Systems (10:26), pp. 1–5.

M: Wolfswinkel, J. F., Furtmueller, E., and Wilderom, C. P. M. 2011. “Using Grounded Theory as a Method for Rigorously Reviewing Literature,” European Journal of Information Systems (22), pp. 1–11.

Supervisor

Dipl.-Kfm. Dennis Steininger

Title

4) Are we just too lazy? Bounded rationality as a concept in Information Systems research.

Goal

Researchers have long assumed that people gather and process all relevant information in order to make optimal choices. Herbert Simon (1955) challenged this “rational man” assumption and introduced bounded rationality theory claiming that individuals are limited by the capabilities, knowledge and information they have and therefore use heuristics for solving complex decision-making problems. Digitalization and complex computer systems steeply increase the amount of information available to users and consumers and potentially foster decisions made using mental shortcuts.

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review on the application of the concept of bounded rationality in Information Systems Research. The work should structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of previous applications of the theory and potential avenues for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Simon, H.A. 1955. A behavioral model of rational choice, The quarterly journal of economics (69:1), pp. 99–118.

M: Webster, J. and R.T. Watson. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz

Title

5) IT portfolio decisions: How the past determines the future of enterprise IT

Goal

IT decision makers can draw from a large selection of powerful hardware and software solutions to enhance their IT infrastructure. Although usefulness, ease of use and cost may be primary drivers of preference determination, the actual decision must also incorporate compatibility and complementarity to existing hardware and software infrastructure within the firm. Therefore, such IT decisions can hardly be generalized but must be investigated within the environment of the adopting firm.

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review bringing together insights from previous literature on IT infrastructure decisions that depend on the IT portfolio as a whole or on previous decisions made. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic, potentially developing a framework of IT portfolio decisions, and conclude with an agenda for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Tornatzky, L.G., and Fleischer, M. 1990. “The Processes of Technological Innovation”. Lexington Books, Lexington, Massachusetts.

T: Cooper, R. B., and Zmud, R. W. 1990. “Information Technology Implementation Research: A Technological Diffusion Approach,” Management Science (36:2), pp. 123–139.

M:  Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review,” MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13-23.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz

Title

6) Towards increasing the practical relevance of IS researchExploring the potential of pragmatism

Goal

Within the IS research community, the interest in qualitative research approaches has grown considerably over the last years. Qualitative research in IS has - until now - been dominated by the paradigm of interpretivism which emphasizes that an understanding of phenomena is achieved by accessing the meanings that people have assigned to the part of the world they interact with. Recent streams in IS literature, however, suggest that there are alternative approaches, pragmatism being one of the most often mentioned perspectives in this context. Pragmatism aims at acting in a practical reality rather than just observing what is happening.

The aim of this seminar paper is to conduct a structured literature review on pragmatism as an alternative approach to qualitative IS research. The paper should examine the role of pragmatism within the body of IS research until now. It should compare pragmatism to interpretivism and motivate why there is a need for alternative paradigms in IS research. Moreover, it should outline how pragmatism could contribute to increase the practical relevance of IS research. Finally, the paper should offer further ideas on possible research fields where pragmatism could be employed to achieve meaningful insights into IS-related phenomena.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Goldkuhl, G. 2012. “Pragmatism vs interpretivism in qualitative information systems research“, European Journal of Information Systems (21:2), pp. 135-146.

T: Goles, T., and Hirschheim, R. 2000. “The paradigm is dead, the paradigm is dead … long live the paradigm: the legacy of Burrell and Morgan”, Omega (28:3), pp. 249-268.

M:  Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review,” MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13-23.

Supervisor

Vanessa Schäffner, M.Sc

Title

7) How to measure actual behavior in privacy research

Goal

In privacy research, many studies rely on measuring intentions as a proxy for people’s actual behavior. However, a so called privacy paradox has been discovered: While privacy concerns are negatively correlated with people’s willingness to disclose information, their level of actual disclosure often largely exceeds the stated intentions. Thus, the question arises which types of behavior are interesting to investigate and how actual behavior can be measured.

Aim of this thesis is to provide a structured review of studies in the privacy area that have already measured actual behavior. The types of investigated behavior should be categorized and the way how behavior has been measured should be analyzed and critically discussed. Furthermore, the work should offer additional ideas on how actual behavior can be realistically measured in future privacy studies.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Norberg, P. A., Horne, D. R., and Horne, D. A. 2007. “The Privacy Paradox: Personal Information Disclosure Intentions versus Behaviors,” Journal of Consumer Affairs (41:1), pp. 100–126.

T: Zimmer, J. C., Arsal, R., Al-Marzouq, M., Moore, D., and Grover, V. 2010. “Knowing Your Customers: Using a Reciprocal Relationship to Enhance Voluntary Information Disclosure,” Decision Support Systems (48:2), pp. 395–406.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review,” MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

Supervisor

Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc

Title

8) Who is intruding my privacy and why should I care? An analysis of stakeholders and their interests when an individual’s privacy is invaded

Goal

Companies such as Facebook, Google, and Amazon use personal information about their customers to improve and personalize their service offerings as this allows them to even better address customer interests and also to increase their profits. Governmental agencies say that they collect and analyze personal information to ensure the safety of their citizens. Potential employers might browse the internet to check out an applicant’s past behavior. Many people see all these types of activities as an intrusion of their privacy while others state that they have nothing to hide and thus don’t care about such activities.

Aim of this seminar paper is to provide a structured analysis on which actors can intrude an individual’s privacy, what motivates them to do so and why individuals might care about such intrusions. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic and conclude with an agenda for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Acquisti, A., Brandimarte, L., and Loewenstein, G. 2015. “Privacy and Human Behavior in the Age of Information,” Science (347:6221), pp. 509–514.

T: Krasnova, H., Günther, O., Spiekermann, S., and Koroleva, K. 2009. “Privacy Concerns and Identity in Online Social Networks,” Identity in the Information Society (2:1), pp. 39–63.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review,” MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

Supervisor

Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc


weitere Informationen zu der Lehrveranstaltung:

empfohlenes Studiensemester der Lehrveranstaltung: ab dem 2. Semester
Fachrichtung Lehrveranstaltung: BWL
Dauer der Lehrveranstaltung: 4 SWS
Typ der Lehrveranstaltung: S - Seminar
Leistungspunkte: 6 ECTS
Bereich: Master iBWL/EPP/DFM: Major/Minor S&I; GBM: GBE; ReWi: SP:UM; Inf. & Infw.: Wirtschaftsinf.
Prüfung: Referat / Hausarbeit
Turnus des Prüfungsangebots: jedes SS/WS
Semester: alle WS und SS