Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät

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Seminar: Advanced Management Information Systems


Dozent(in): Prof. Dr. Daniel Veit; Dr. Manuel Trenz; Alexander Frey, M.Sc.; Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc; Vanessa Schäffner, M.Sc.
Termin: Anmeldung: 05.10.-18.10.2015
Gebäude/Raum: Kick-off: FW 2102; Zwischenpräsentation: FW 2102
Weitere Termine: Benachrichtigung: 21.10.2015
Kick-Off: 29.10.2015, 10:00-11:30 Uhr
Zwischenpräsentation: 12.01.2016, 14:00-18:00 Uhr
Abgabe: 29.02.2016, 12:00 Uhr
Ansprechpartner: Dr. Manuel Trenz


Zusammenfassung:

Upon the successful completion of this module, students have extended their knowledge on management information systems and empirical research in the information systems field. Topics of this seminar pertain to strategic questions on innovation, adoption and continued use of management information systems. Students learn how to conduct, write and present a systematic and academic literature review on their individually assigned topic. By doing so, students gain a fundamental understanding of the principles of empirical academic work and obtain the ability to systematically and independently address a research topic. Accordingly, the knowledge and methodological skills acquired in this seminar are a necessary foundation to write a master thesis at the chair. Besides fostering analytical thinking, this seminar will also facilitate the improvement of English skills, as the entire seminar is held in English. Thus, after the successful completion of this module, students will have improved their writing, presentation and discussion skills in English.


Inhalt der Lehrveranstaltung:

Part 1

- Introduction to academic research principles and academic writing

Part 2

- Examination of the topic and the research question
- Investigation of the theoretical and methodological foundation
- Structured analysis of the current state of research
- Analysis and structuration of the results

with regard to one specific topic in the field of management information systems research

Part 3

- Writing of the seminar thesis
- Presentation and discussion of the results


Vorkenntnis für die Lehrveranstaltung:

Grundlegendes Wissen zu den Themenfeldern (bspw. durch Besuch der Vorlesungen des Lehrstuhls) ist hilfreich. 

Gute Englischkenntnisse sind notwendig, um die Literatur zu verstehen und die Präsentation sowie die Seminararbeit auszuarbeiten.

Der Besuch eines Einführungskurses der Universitätsbibliothek wird empfohlen.


Literatur zur Lehrveranstaltung:

Die Literatur wird im Rahmen des Seminars zugeteilt.

Bewerbung


Die Bewerbung erfolgt im oben angegebenen Zeitraum via Digicampus.

 

Seminar Topics

Weitere mögliche Seminarthemen werden zeitnah hier bekannt gegeben.


Title

1) Who influences my decisions and why? A structured literature review on social influence theory in Information Systems Research

Goal

Social influence theory describes different processes through which individuals may be influenced in their opinions, attitudes, or behaviors. Since the interaction with technology is often a social process that also involves certain levels of uncertainty, social influences can be expected to be important to understand phenomena with regards to information systems.

This master seminar thesis has two goals. First, the development of social influence theory as well as the theory itself should be described briefly. Second, a structured literature review on the application of social influence theory in Information Systems Research should be undertaken. The work should conclude with a research agenda proposing new avenues with regards to social influence theory in this research field.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Burnkrant, R.E. and Cousineau, A. 1975. “Informational and Normative Social Influence in Buyer Behavior,” Journal of Consumer Research (2:3), pp. 206–215.

T: Lewis, W., Agarwal, R. and Sambamurthy, V. 2003. Sources of influence on beliefs about information technology use: an empirical study of knowledge workers, MIS Quarterly (27:4), pp. 657–678.

T:  Venkatesh, V., Morris, M.G., Davis, G. B. and Davis, F.D. 2003. User Acceptance of Information Technology: Toward a Unified View, MIS Quarterly (27:3), pp. 425–478.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz 

Title

2) What is really different in cloud computing and when does it matter for research? A structured analysis.

Goal

Cloud computing enables sourcing of information technology (IT) services from a shared pool of computing resources over the internet, including, servers, storage, platforms, and applications (Mell and Grance, 2011). Nevertheless, many researchers are struggling to argue why this new set of services differs so fundamentally from IT artifacts, IT outsourcing or e-commerce that phenomena need to be reinvestigated in this new context.

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review on cloud computing research in the AIS top-50 journals list to identify core arguments used to justify cloud research and the domain of validity of the arguments. Using this data source, the aim of this study is to develop a map of overlaps between cloud computing and related concepts that can be used to identify research areas that may be particularly promising in the context of cloud computing.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Schneider, S., and Sunyaev, A. 2014. “Determinant Factors of Cloud-Sourcing Decisions: Reflecting on the IT Outsourcing Literature in the Era of Cloud Computing” Journal of Information Technology.

T: Mell, P., and Grance, T. 2011. “The NIST Definition of Cloud Computing” (available online at http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-145/SP800-145.pdf)

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz

Title

3) Are we just too lazy? Bounded rationality as a concept in Information Systems research.

Goal

Researchers have long assumed that people gather and process all relevant information in order to make optimal choices. Herbert Simon (1955) challenged this “rational man” assumption and introduced bounded rationality theory claiming that individuals are limited by the capabilities, knowledge and information they have and therefore use heuristics for solving complex decision-making problems. Digitalization and complex computer systems steeply increase the amount of information available to users and consumers and potentially foster decisions made using mental shortcuts.

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review on the application of the concept of bounded rationality in Information Systems Research. The work should structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of previous applications of the theory and potential avenues for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Simon, H.A. (1955). "A behavioral model of rational choice." The Quarterly Journal of Economics, pp. 99–118.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz

Title

4) Where is the love? The role of emotions in online transactions

Goal

As markets mature, firms and products become more similar. From a rational point of view, many markets offer choices between options that are interchangeable without a loss in product or service quality. In these situations, it can be challenging for vendors or providers to differentiate themselves. Nevertheless, more often than not, individuals develop preferences for selected products or vendors in a set of homogenous alternatives and make irrational decisions. Strong drivers of such decisions are our emotions.

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review bringing together insights from previous literature to explain why and when emotions influence our decisions to conduct, retain or cancel specific online transactions. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic and conclude with an agenda for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Chea, S., and Luo, M. M. 2008. “Post-Adoption Behaviors of E-Service Customers: The Interplay of Cognition and Emotion” International Journal of Electronic Commerce (12:3), pp. 29–56.

T: Verhagen, T., and van Dolen, W. 2011. “The Influence of Online Store Beliefs on Consumer Online Impulse Buying: A Model and Empirical Application” Information & Management (48:8), pp. 320–327.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz


Title

5) Competition in Two-Sided Markets

Goal

The online auction platform eBay is a typical example for a two-sided market. On the one side the platform needs a critical mass of buyers to be attractive for sellers, on the other side the platform needs a critical mass of sellers to address possible buyers. The competition in two-sided markets can be high.

The aim of this seminar paper is to review and structure existing literature how to deal with competition in two-sided markets and to identify research gaps.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Rochet, J.-C., & Tirole, J. (2003). Platform Competition in Two-sided Markets. Journal of the European Economic Association, 1(4), 990–1029.

T: Parker, G. G., & Van Alstyne, M. W. (2005). Two-Sided Network Effects: A Theory of Information Product Design. Management Science, 51(10), 1494–1504.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

Supervisor

Alexander Frey

Title

6) Working for Free? Why people participate in Open-Source Projects

Goal

The operating system Linux is one popular example for an open-source software project. Understanding why developers participate in open-source projects is crucial for assessing the impact of open-source software. What motivates developers to participate in open source projects?

The aim of this seminar paper is to conduct a structured literature review on participation behavior within open source projects. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic and avenues for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Hann, I.-H., Roberts, J., & Slaughter, S. (2004). Why Developers Participate in Open Source Software Projects: An Empirical Investigation. ICIS 2004 Proceedings.

T: Ke, W., & Zhang, P. (2008). Motivations for Participating in Open Source Software Communities: Roles of Psychological Needs and Altruism. PACIS 2008 Proceedings.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

Supervisor

Alexander Frey

Title

7) Trust building in Sharing Economy services

Goal

Instead of buying and owning products, consumers are increasingly interested in leasing and sharing them over certain internet platforms. This recent trend is often referred to as the “Sharing Economy”. Sharing platforms such as AirBnB provide services in unlocking the value inherent in sharing spare resources with people who want them. Users  of  the  sharing  economy  voluntarily participate  to directly  share  goods  with  others  on  the  basis  of  trust. How can the trust in online sharing services be enhanced?

The aim of this seminar paper is to review and structure existing literature on trust building mechanism of online services, especially of online sharing services. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic and avenues for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Kim, J., Yoon, Y., & Zo, H. (2015). Why People Participate in the Sharing Economy: A Social Exchange Perspective.

T: Lamberton, C. P., & Rose, R. L. (2012). When Is Ours Better Than Mine? A Framework for Understanding and Altering Participation in Commercial Sharing Systems. Journal of Marketing, 76(4), 109–125.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

Supervisor

Alexander Frey

Title

8) Social Exchange Theory

Goal

Social Exchange Theory (SET) has been widely adopted as one of the most influential theories to explain social interaction information. SET posits that based on subjective cost-benefit analysis and comparison of alternatives, individuals intend to choose the relationship that maximizes their benefits.

The goal of this seminar paper is to conduct a systematic literature review on SET including an analysis how SET was adapted and applied to IS literature. Moreover, potential future applications of SET in IS research should be discussed.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Liang, T.-P., Liu, C.-C., & Wu, C.-H. (2008). Can social exchange theory explain individual knowledge-sharing behavior? A meta-analysis. ICIS 2008 Proceedings.

M: Webster, J., and Watson, R. T. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. xiii-xxiii.

Supervisor

Alexander Frey


weitere Informationen zu der Lehrveranstaltung:

empfohlenes Studiensemester der Lehrveranstaltung: ab dem 1. Semester
Fachrichtung Lehrveranstaltung: Master
Dauer der Lehrveranstaltung: 4 SWS
Typ der Lehrveranstaltung: S - Seminar
Leistungspunkte: 6 ECTS
Bereich: iBWL: Profilierung Wirtschaftsinformatik; DFM: S&I
Prüfung: Referat / Hausarbeit
Semester: jedes WS