Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät

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Seminar: Advanced Management Information Systems


Dozent(in): Prof. Dr. Daniel Veit; Dr. Manuel Trenz; Anna Budrevich, M.Sc.; Alexander Frey, M.Sc.; Sabrina Karwatzki, M.Sc; Vanessa Schäffner, M.Sc.; Dipl.-Kfm. Dennis Steininger
Termin: Anmeldung: 10.10.-23.10.16
Gebäude/Raum: Kick-off: FW 2101, Zwischenpräsentation: FW 2102
Weitere Termine: Benachrichtigung: 25.10.16
Kick-Off: 27.10.16, 09:00 - 11:00 Uhr
Zwischenpräsentation: 18.01.17, 08:00 - 12:00 Uhr
Abgabe: 15.03.17, 11:59 Uhr
Ansprechpartner: Sabrina Karwatzki, M.Sc.


Zusammenfassung:

Upon the successful completion of this module, students have extended their knowledge on management information systems and empirical research in the information systems field. Topics of this seminar pertain to strategic questions on innovation, adoption and continued use of management information systems. Students learn how to conduct, write and present a systematic and academic literature review on their individually assigned topic. By doing so, students gain a fundamental understanding of the principles of empirical academic work and obtain the ability to systematically and independently address a research topic. Accordingly, the knowledge and methodological skills acquired in this seminar are a necessary foundation to write a master thesis at the chair. Besides fostering analytical thinking, this seminar will also facilitate the improvement of English skills, as the entire seminar is held in English. Thus, after the successful completion of this module, students will have improved their writing, presentation and discussion skills in English.


Inhalt der Lehrveranstaltung:

Part 1

- Introduction to academic research principles and academic writing

Part 2

- Examination of the topic and the research question
- Investigation of the theoretical and methodological foundation
- Structured analysis of the current state of research
- Analysis and structuration of the results

with regard to one specific topic in the field of management information systems research

Part 3

- Writing of the seminar thesis
- Presentation and discussion of the results


Vorkenntnis für die Lehrveranstaltung:

Grundlegendes Wissen zu den Themenfeldern (bspw. durch Besuch der Vorlesungen des Lehrstuhls) ist hilfreich. 

Gute Englischkenntnisse sind notwendig, um die Literatur zu verstehen und die Präsentation sowie die Seminararbeit auszuarbeiten.

Der Besuch eines Einführungskurses der Universitätsbibliothek wird empfohlen.


Literatur zur Lehrveranstaltung:

Die Literatur wird im Rahmen des Seminars zugeteilt.

Bewerbung


Die Bewerbung erfolgt im oben angegebenen Zeitraum via Digicampus.

 

Seminar Topics

Weitere mögliche Seminarthemen werden zeitnah hier bekannt gegeben.

Title

1) Are we just too lazy? Bounded rationality as a concept in Information Systems research.

Goal

Researchers have long assumed that people gather and process all relevant information in order to make optimal choices. Herbert Simon (1955) challenged this “rational man” assumption and introduced bounded rationality theory claiming that individuals are limited by the capabilities, knowledge and information they have and therefore use heuristics for solving complex decision-making problems. Digitalization and complex computer systems steeply increase the amount of information available to users and consumers and potentially foster decisions made using mental shortcuts.

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review on the application of the concept of bounded rationality in Information Systems Research. The work should structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of previous applications of the theory and potential avenues for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Simon, H.A. (1955). "A behavioral model of rational choice." The quarterly journal of economics, pp. 99–118.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz 

Title

2) IT portfolio decisions: How the past determines the future of enterprise IT

Goal

IT decision makers can draw from a large selection of powerful hardware and software solutions to enhance their IT infrastructure. Although usefulness, ease of use and cost may be primary drivers of preference determination, the actual decision must also incorporate compatibility and complementarity to existing hardware and software infrastructure within the firm. Therefore, such IT decisions can hardly be generalized but must be investigated within the environment of the adopting firm.

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review bringing together insights from previous literature on IT infrastructure decisions that depend on the IT portfolio as a whole or on previous decisions made. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic, potentially developing a framework of IT portfolio decisions, and conclude with an agenda for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Tornatzky, L.G., and Fleischer, M. 1990. “The Processes of Technological Innovation”. Lexington Books, Lexington, Massachusetts.

T: Cooper, R. B., and Zmud, R. W. 1990. “Information Technology Implementation Research: A Technological Diffusion Approach,” Management Science (36:2), pp. 123–139.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz 

Title

3) Information cues in a digital world – who do we react to?

Goal

In a world saturated with information and recommendations from many different sources, individuals increasingly disregard many information cues. At the same time, the digital environment is changing at a tremendous speed with new, complex technologies increasing the need for constant evaluation. Researchers have distinguished between first, second, and third-party information cues (Özpolat et al. 2013). Each information cue was shown to be an effective information source in specific situations (Pavlou et al. 2007, Trenz et al. 2015).

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review on the effectiveness of different information cues in order to generate an aggregated understanding on which types of information are value in specific situations and for specific types of individuals. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic, potentially deriving a higher order understanding of information cues, and conclude with an agenda for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Özpolat, K., Gao, G. (Gordon), Jank, W., and Viswanathan, S. 2013. “Research Note — The Value of Third-Party Assurance Seals in Online Retailing: An Empirical Investigation” Information Systems Research (24:4), pp.1100–1111.

T: Pavlou, P. A., Huigang Liang, and Yajiong Xue. 2007. “Understanding and Mitigating Uncertainty in Online Exchange Relationships: A Principal--Agent Perspective” MIS Quarterly (31:1), pp.105–136.

T: Trenz, M., Huntgeburth, J., and Veit, D. 2015. “The Flock in the Cloud - How Social Influence Processes Shape Cloud Service Relationships” in Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Information Systems, Fort Worth, TX, December 13.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz 

Title

4) Personal digital health devices and services – Empowering patients or insurances?

Goal

Digital health devices and services allow individuals to continuously track their heart rates, nutrition, or even blood sugar levels. Thus, those services provide all involved parties with more powerful information regarding the health constitution of the individual (Kelley et al. 2011). While such devices or services without doubt can improve the treatment of patients (e.g., Goh et al. 2016), they also can lead to negative psychological outcomes as well as financial or personal discrimination (Angst and Agarwal 2009). Therefore, interactions and outcomes of such digital health devices are in the center of health-related information systems research.

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review bringing together insights from previous literature on the adoption processes, motivations of different parties, use patterns, and outcomes of digital health devices. The work should identify the relevant literature streams and structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of the current scientific knowledge on this topic, potentially developing a systematization of personal digital health devices and services, and conclude with an agenda for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Angst, C., and Agarwal, R. 2009. “Adoption of Electronic Health Records in the Presence of Privacy Concerns: The Elaboration Likelihood Model and Individual Persuasion” MIS Quarterly (33:2), pp.339–370.

T: Goh, J. M., Gao, G., and Agarwal, R. 2016. “The Creation of Social Value: Can an Online Health Community Reduce Rural-Urban Health Disparities?” MIS Quarterly (40:1), pp.247–263.

T: Kelley, H., Chiasson, M., Downey, A., and Pacaud, D. 2011. “The Clinical Impact of eHealth on the Self-Management of Diabetes: A Double Adoption Perspective” Journal of the Association for Information Systems (12:3), p.208.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Dr. Manuel Trenz 

Title

5) The role of emotions, biases, and bounded rationality in information privacy research

Goal

Most privacy research takes a rational perspective on how individuals deal with their privacy: It assumes that individuals’ responses to external stimuli result in deliberate analyses, which lead to fully informed privacy-related attitudes and behaviors. However, in reality many individuals engage in privacy-related behaviors spontaneously and without complete information. Thus, individuals make use of simple heuristics and cognitive shortcuts in their decision-making process.

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review on whether and how emotions, biases, heuristics, and bounded rationality have been taken into consideration in information privacy research. The work should structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of previous applications of the concepts and potential avenues for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T:Acquisti, A., and Grossklags, J. 2005. “Privacy and rationality in individual decision making,” Security & Privacy, IEEE (3:1), pp. 26–33.

T:Li H., Sarathy R., Zhang J. 2008. “The role of emotions in shaping consumers’ privacy beliefs about unfamiliar online vendors.” Journal of Information Privacy Security (4:3), pp. 36–62.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc.

Title

6) Coping theory in information systems research

Goal

Coping theory describes how individuals deal with stressful and threatening events. As information technology can lead to technostress, threaten individuals’ privacy, or create feelings of uncertainty when being newly introduced in organizations, individuals somehow have to cope with all these challenges. It is thus important to understand the phenomenon of coping strategies in information systems research.

This master seminar thesis has two goals. First, the development of coping theory as well as the theory itself should be described briefly. Second, a structured literature review on the application of coping theory in information systems research should be undertaken. The work should conclude with a research agenda proposing new avenues with regards to coping theory in this research field.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Lazarus, R. S., and Folkman, S. 1984. Stress, appraisal, and coping, New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company LLC.

T: D’Arcy, J., Herath, T., and Shoss, M. K. 2014. “Understanding Employee Responses to Stressful Information Security Requirements: A Coping Perspective,” Journal of Management Information Systems (31:2), pp. 285–318.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc.

Title

7) How to measure actual behavior in information privacy research

Goal

In privacy research, many studies rely on measuring intentions as a proxy for people’s actual behavior. However, a so called privacy paradox has been discovered: While privacy concerns are negatively correlated with people’s willingness to disclose information, their level of actual disclosure often largely exceeds the stated intentions. Thus, the question arises which types of behavior are interesting to investigate and how actual behavior can be measured.

Aim of this thesis is to provide a structured review of studies in the privacy area that have already measured actual behavior. The types of investigated behavior should be categorized and the way how behavior has been measured should be analyzed and critically discussed. Furthermore, the work should offer additional ideas on how actual behavior can be realistically measured in future privacy studies.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Norberg, P. A., Horne, D. R., and Horne, D. A. 2007. “The Privacy Paradox: Personal Information Disclosure Intentions versus Behaviors,” Journal of Consumer Affairs (41:1), pp. 100–126.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc.

Title

8) How to mitigate individuals’ privacy risk perceptions – an organizational perspective

Goal

Surveys constantly show that individuals have high privacy concerns in general terms. Yet, we can observe that many individuals nonetheless share huge amounts of information online. Thus, it seems that organizations somehow successfully mitigate individuals’ perceptions of their privacy being at risk in specific situations.

The aim of this master seminar thesis is to conduct a structured literature review on the mechanisms that organizations can use to reduce their customers’ perceptions of privacy risks. The work should structure the results of previous studies in a comprehensive way in order to provide researchers with an understanding of which mitigation mechanisms are already used and how they work as well as potential avenues for future research.

Readings on the Topic (T) and possible Methods (M)

T: Bélanger, F., Hiller, J. S., and Smith, W. J. 2002. “Trustworthiness in Electronic Commerce: The Role of Privacy, Security, and Site Attributes,” The Journal of Strategic Information Systemsy (11:3), pp. 245–270.

M: Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. 2002. Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review, MIS Quarterly (26:2), pp. 13–23.

Supervisor

Sabrina Hauff, M.Sc.


weitere Informationen zu der Lehrveranstaltung:

empfohlenes Studiensemester der Lehrveranstaltung: ab dem 1. Semester
Fachrichtung Lehrveranstaltung: Master
Dauer der Lehrveranstaltung: 4 SWS
Typ der Lehrveranstaltung: S - Seminar
Leistungspunkte: 6 ECTS
Bereich: iBWL: Profilierung Wirtschaftsinformatik; DFM: S&I
Prüfung: Referat / Hausarbeit
Semester: jedes WS